Court Of Impeachment And War Crimes: IMPEACHMENT: Voter Rage Over Lack Of War End and Stalling on Impeachment could upset the 2008 Election Cart for The Democrats. Tools to move the Lead
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An interview with Naomi Wolf about the 10 steps from democracy to dictatorship!

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Stop the Spying!

Thursday, April 12, 2007

IMPEACHMENT: Voter Rage Over Lack Of War End and Stalling on Impeachment could upset the 2008 Election Cart for The Democrats. Tools to move the Lead




The “LEADERS” of this nation have turned have turned their backs on the American people and have ignored the message we sent in the November 2007 elections.

The Republicans continue to insist upon following a failed and seriously flawed President into the chasm of murder and slaughter in Iraq.

The Democrats have on beltway blinders, calculating their every word and action in what they perceive as a massive victory in 2008.

Both parties have abandoned every wish of the people. The money to finance 2008 should stop.

They should be made to understand that the 435 members of The House of Representatives to be elected/reelected in November of 2008 will find no favor among us if they are not among the number who have had the courage and integrity to stand up for the end of a failed and illegal war.

They should be made to understand that the 435 members of The House of Representatives to be elected/reelected in November of 2008 will find no favor among us if they are not among the number who have had the courage and integrity to stand up for the Impeachment of the worst President in our History, a man and an administration that has run so far amuck that the fabric of our Democracy is in peril and their actions are clearly criminal, not just incompetent and disagreeable. They must be held accountable!

The entire membership of The House and 35, possibly plus, Senate seats will be on the electoral chopping block, and yes the Gold Ring Prize, The Presidency. I will not support anyone in any way who does not from this day forward come forth advocating immediate withdrawal from Iraq and actively seeking to end the Bush Administration, in at least IMPEACHMENT!

The words, Indict, Impeach, and Imprison are no longer hollow; they represent a reality that must be acted upon.


To inform you as completely as possible of the state of the 2008 elections possibilities as they are known at the moment, this post is offered with all links necessary to reach out and impact the leaders of this country: National, State and local.

Remember; Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill said: “All politics is local.” That is a political truism. You represent those wonderful words: “We The People” and you are that “Local” voice.

Exercise that voice. I implore you to speak out and act up.

George W. Bush is “The Decider” only so long as we let him make decisions. The time for that to end is now.

We are expected to be law abiding responsible citizens, and I expect our Congress to be law abiding and faithful to their oaths of office. If they are not, each and every one of them who engages in spin fashioned excuses and evasion of duty, should be removed from office and never benefit from another dollar in contribution, a yard sign of support, or our vote.

Let them know that all the trappings of campaigning and fund raising are not going to mean anything this time.

We are involved in VOTER RAGE, and while they play the political game we are going to vote for only those candidates who are listening and responsive, only those candidates who exhibit in word and actions, courage and integrity.

The rest of them had jobs before they came to Washington, State Houses of Council table; they can go back to them and rejoin the real world that you and I live in and try to keep decent for those as yet unborn.

Read on to inform and arm yourself and then please take a few minutes to ACT!!!

http://www.backwardsbush.com

U.S. Senators – Search for your senators by name, state, or congressional class; and visit their websites, send them an email or locate their mailing address.

U.S. Representatives – Find contact information for your U.S. representative by typing in your zip code, send them an email or locate their mailing address.

State Governors – Select your state to access e-mail, telephone, and postal contact information for your governor, send him/her an email or locate their mailing address so that you can encourage that your state officially join the ranks of those against the continuation of the war, and those prepared to exercise the Constitutional Right to move for the Impeachment of The President and Vice President of The United States of America.

State Legislators – Search for state legislators and topical legislative information, by U.S. states and territories, so that you can encourage that your state officially join the ranks of those against the continuation of the war, and those prepared to exercise the Constitutional Right to move for the Impeachment of The President and Vice President of The United States of America.

City Mayors – Search for local Mayors so that you can encourage local Mayors and City Governance bodies to take action against the continuation of the war, and those prepared to exercise the Constitutional Right to move for the Impeachment of The President and Vice President of The United States of America.

Contact Anti War and Pro Impeachment Organizations – Search for updated news, coming public events and aid, advise and resources to make the voice of “We The People” heard, loud and clear. 773,000 entries, 100 screen pages.


Senate 2008 Guru

2 Races
2.1 Retiring Senators
2.1.1 Wayne Allard (R) of Colorado

In Colorado, incumbent Republican Wayne Allard limited himself to two terms. On January 15, 2007, Allard formally announced he would not seek re-election.[3]

Republicans: Former U.S. Representatives Bob Schaffer is a likely candidate. Also considering running is former Representative Bob Beauprez, who lost in the 2006 gubernatorial election to Bill Ritter. Retired Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway and former governor Bill Owens have both ruled out a run.[4][5] On March 21, 2007 McInnis dropped out of the race. The strongest remaining Republican in consideration is widely held to be state Attorney General John Suthers

Democrats: The Democratic nominee will almost certainly be U.S. Representative Mark Udall, who has announced that he will seek the seat and is unlikely to draw significant primary opposition.[6]

2.2 Possible retiring Senators

2.2.1 Joe Biden (D) of Delaware biden.senate.gov/contact/emailjoe.cfm

2.2.2 Larry Craig (R) of Idaho

2.2.3 Chuck Hagel (R) of Nebraska

2.2.4 John Warner (R) of Virginia

2.3 Democratic incumbent races

2.3.1 Max Baucus of Montana baucus.senate.gov/contact/emailForm.cfm?subj=issue

2.3.2 Dick Durbin of Illinois

durbin.senate.gov/contact.cfm

Obama, Barack- (D - IL)-Class III
713 HART SENATE OFFICE BUILDING WASHINGTON DC 20510
(202) 224-2854
Web Form: obama.senate.gov/contact


2.3.3 Tom Harkin of Iowa harkin.senate.gov/contact/contact.cfm

2.3.4 Tim Johnson of South Dakota johnson.senate.gov/emailform.cfm

2.3.5 John Kerry of Massachusetts kerry.senate.gov/v3/contact/email.html

2.3.6 Mary Landrieu of Louisiana landrieu.senate.gov/contact/index.cfm

2.3.7 Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey lautenberg.senate.gov/contact

2.3.8 Carl Levin of Michigan levin.senate.gov/contact/index.cfm

2.3.9 Mark Pryor of Arkansas pryor.senate.gov/contact/

2.3.10 Jack Reed of Rhode Island reed.senate.gov/contact/contact-share.cfm

2.3.11 Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia rockefeller.senate.gov/services/email.cfm

2.4 Republican incumbent races

2.4.1 Lamar Alexander of Tennessee

2.4.2 Saxby Chambliss of Georgia

2.4.3 Thad Cochran of Mississippi

2.4.4 Norm Coleman of Minnesota

2.4.5 Susan Collins of Maine

2.4.6 John Cornyn of Texas

2.4.7 Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina

2.4.8 Pete Domenici of New Mexico

2.4.9 Michael Enzi of Wyoming

2.4.10 Lindsey Graham of South Carolina

2.4.11 Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma

2.4.12 Mitch McConnell of Kentucky

2.4.13 Pat Roberts of Kansas

2.4.14 Jeff Sessions of Alabama

2.4.15 Gordon Smith of Oregon

2.4.16 Ted Stevens of Alaska

2.4.17 John Sununu of New Hampshire

3 Senate contests in 2008

Democratic Party Links

Democratic National Committee

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

Democratic Senatorial Candidates

Alabama: Agriculture and Industry Commissioner Ron Sparks (considering) State Senator Vivian Figures (considering)

Alaska: unknown

Arkansas: Senator Mark Pryor

Colorado: Congressman Mark Udall

Delaware: Senator Joe Biden

Georgia: unknown

Idaho: Former Congressman Larry La Rocco

Illinois: Senator Richard Durbin
Rumor About a Durbin Challenger

Iowa: Senator Tom Harkin

Kansas: unknown

Kentucky: unknown

Louisiana: Senator Mary Landrieu

Maine: Congressman Tom Allen (considering)

Massachusetts: Senator John Kerry

Michigan: Senator Carl Levin

Minnesota: Commentator Al FrankenAttorney Mike CiresiState Representative John Lesch (considering)

Mississippi: unknown

Montanta: Senator Max Baucus

Nebraska: Omaha Mayor Mike Fahey (considering)

New Hampshire: Portsmouth Mayor Steve MarchandActivist Katrina SwettProfessor/former astronaut Jay Buckey (considering)

New Jersey: Senator Frank Lautenberg

New Mexico: unknown

North Carolina: unknown

Oklahoma: unknown

Oregon: Congressman Peter DeFazio (considering) Activist Steve Novick (considering)

Rhode Island: Senator Jack Reed

South Carolina: unknown

South Dakota: Senator Tim Johnson

Tennessee: unknown

Texas: unknown

Virginia: unknown

West Virginia: Senator Jay Rockefeller

Wyoming: unknown

Links

Cook Political Report Senate Race Ratings (2/21/07)

National Journal 2008 Senate Race Rankings (2/12/07)

Rothenberg Political Report Senate Race Ratings (1/12/07)

Survey USA Senator Approval Ratings (11/22/06)

2008 Senate Race Tracker Wiki

Pollster.com

Project Vote Smart

Senator Chuck Schumer's Positively American

Americans United for Change

Empowering Veterans

2.3 Democratic incumbent races

2.3.1 Max Baucus of Montana

2.3.2 Dick Durbin of Illinois

2.3.3 Tom Harkin of Iowa

2.3.4 Tim Johnson of South Dakota

2.3.5 John Kerry of Massachusetts

2.3.6 Mary Landrieu of Louisiana

2.3.7 Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey

2.3.8 Carl Levin of Michigan

2.3.9 Mark Pryor of Arkansas

2.3.10 Jack Reed of Rhode Island

2.3.11 Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia

Republican incumbent races

2.4.1 Lamar Alexander of Tennessee

2.4.2 Saxby Chambliss of Georgia

2.4.3 Thad Cochran of Mississippi

2.4.4 Norm Coleman of Minnesota

2.4.5 Susan Collins of Maine

2.4.6 John Cornyn of Texas

2.4.7 Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina

2.4.8 Pete Domenici of New Mexico

2.4.9 Michael Enzi of Wyoming

2.4.10 Lindsey Graham of South Carolina

2.4.11 Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma

2.4.12 Mitch McConnell of Kentucky

2.4.13 Pat Roberts of Kansas

2.4.14 Jeff Sessions of Alabama

2.4.15 Gordon Smith of Oregon

2.4.16 Ted Stevens of Alaska

2.4.17 John Sununu of New Hampshire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate_election%2C_2008

Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. Since Senators are elected for six-year terms, those elected will serve from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2015.

They will join Senate Class II, which traces its roots back to the Senators who served four-year terms from March 4, 1789 until March 2, 1793. Current Class II Senators, who were elected in 2002, will seek re-election or retire in 2008.

The U.S. presidential election, 2008, U.S. gubernatorial elections, 2008 and U.S. House election, 2008 will occur on the same date, as well as many state and local elections.

The composition of the Senate going into the 2008 election will include 49 Republicans and 49 Democrats (plus two independents, Bernie Sanders (VT) and Joe Lieberman (CT), who will caucus with Democrats). Of the seats up for election in 2008, 21 are held by Republicans and 12 by Democrats.

There may be additional changes of incumbents to the list below if Senators die or resign. If Senators in other classes die or resign between 2006 and 2008, there may be additional special elections in 2008.

The dates between which the death or resignation of a Senator would lead to a special election in 2008 vary from state to state.

Currently, as of February 2007, Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD) is recovering from a Cerebral arteriovenous malformation, and Senator Craig Thomas (R-WY) is undergoing cancer treatment, and there has been public speculation as to whether these two senators will remain in office.

1 Predictions
1.1 The Hotline
1.2 CQPolitics
2 Races
2.1 Retiring Senators
2.1.1 Wayne Allard (R) of Colorado
2.2 Possible retiring Senators
2.2.1 Joe Biden (D) of Delaware
2.2.2 Larry Craig (R) of Idaho
2.2.3 Chuck Hagel (R) of Nebraska
2.2.4 John Warner (R) of Virginia
2.3 Democratic incumbent races
2.3.1 Max Baucus of Montana
2.3.2 Dick Durbin of Illinois
2.3.3 Tom Harkin of Iowa
2.3.4 Tim Johnson of South Dakota
2.3.5 John Kerry of Massachusetts
2.3.6 Mary Landrieu of Louisiana
2.3.7 Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey
2.3.8 Carl Levin of Michigan
2.3.9 Mark Pryor of Arkansas
2.3.10 Jack Reed of Rhode Island
2.3.11 Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia
2.4 Republican incumbent races
2.4.1 Lamar Alexander of Tennessee
2.4.2 Saxby Chambliss of Georgia
2.4.3 Thad Cochran of Mississippi
2.4.4 Norm Coleman of Minnesota
2.4.5 Susan Collins of Maine
2.4.6 John Cornyn of Texas
2.4.7 Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina
2.4.8 Pete Domenici of New Mexico
2.4.9 Michael Enzi of Wyoming
2.4.10 Lindsey Graham of South Carolina
2.4.11 Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma
2.4.12 Mitch McConnell of Kentucky
2.4.13 Pat Roberts of Kansas
2.4.14 Jeff Sessions of Alabama
2.4.15 Gordon Smith of Oregon
2.4.16 Ted Stevens of Alaska
2.4.17 John Sununu of New Hampshire
3 Senate contests in 2008
4 External links
5 References
6 See also

Predictions

Democrats possess the field advantage in 2008. They need only to defend twelve seats, while Republicans must defend twenty-one. Of the twenty-one Republicans however, only four are in states won by Senator John Kerry in the 2004 election (OR, ME, MN, and NH). Six of the twelve Democrats on the other hand are in states won by President George W. Bush (AR, IA, LA, MT, SD, and WV).

The Hotline

In February 2007, The Hotline's Chuck Todd named Mary Landrieu (D-LA), Norm Coleman (R-MN), John Sununu (R-NH), Susan Collins (R-ME), Tim Johnson (D-SD), Gordon Smith (R-OR), Elizabeth Dole (R-NC), Max Baucus (D-MT), and Tom Harkin (D-IA) as the nine most vulnerable Senate incumbents from most to least vulnerable.[1]

CQPolitics

CQPolitics.com produced their first analysis of the 2008 Senate race on January 26, 2007.[2] They rank the contests accordingly:

Eight Republican seats (AK, ID, KS, KY, MS, NE, NM and WY) are considered Safe Republican, meaning the races are not expected to be competitive.

Seven Republican seats (AL, GA, OK, SC, TN, TX and VA) are considered Republican Favored, meaning the races are not currently competitive but could conceivably become so under the right circumstances.

Five Republican seats currently held by Susan Collins (ME), Norm Coleman (MN), John E. Sununu (NH), Elizabeth Dole (NC) and Gordon H. Smith (OR) are considered Leans Republican, meaning the race is competitive but the Republican has a distinct advantage.

Two seats, currently held by retiring Republican Wayne Allard (CO) and Democrat Tim Johnson (SD), are rated No Clear Favorite, meaning no party has a distinct advantage.

One Democratic seat currently held by Mary Landrieu (LA) is considered Leans Democratic.

Four Democratic seats (AR, IA, MT and NJ) are considered Democrat Favored.

Six Democratic seats (DE, IL, MA, MI, RI and WV) are considered Safe Democratic.

Races

Retiring Senators

Only one senator, Wayne Allard of Colorado, has announced his retirement, and only two have not announced their re-election plans: Chuck Hagel of Nebraska and John Warner of Virginia. Senator Joe Biden of Delaware will run for re-election if his bid for the Democratic Presidential nomination is unsuccessful. Other senators who have announced their candidacies for re-election may voluntarily or involuntarily cancel their plans.

Wayne Allard (R) of Colorado

Main article: Colorado United States Senate election, 2008

In Colorado, incumbent Republican Wayne Allard limited himself to two terms. On January 15, 2007, Allard formally announced he would not seek re-election.[3]

Republicans: Former U.S. Representatives Bob Schaffer is a likely candidate. Also considering running is former Representative Bob Beauprez, who lost in the 2006 gubernatorial election to Bill Ritter. Retired Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway and former governor Bill Owens have both ruled out a run.[4][5] On March 21, 2007 McInnis dropped out of the race. The strongest remaining Republican in consideration is widely held to be state Attorney General John Suthers

Democrats: The Democratic nominee will almost certainly be U.S. Representative Mark Udall, who has announced that he will seek the seat and is unlikely to draw significant primary opposition.[6]

Possible retiring Senators

Joe Biden (D) of Delaware

Main article: Delaware United States Senate election, 2008

Incumbent Democratic Senator Joe Biden has announced he is running for President.[7] Biden may run for both the Presidency and the Senate simultaneously, but may choose to retire from the Senate to focus exclusively on the Presidency. Should he retire, the 2008 race would feature the first open Delaware seat since 1970, should he not run for re-election, State Treasurer Jack Markell (D) or Attorney General Beau Biden, Sen. Biden's son, may run.

Republican U.S. Representative Michael Castle is a potential Republican candidate.

Larry Craig (R) of Idaho

Main article: Idaho United States Senate election, 2008

In Idaho, Larry Craig has not indicated if he will run for a fourth term. Former Canyon County commissioner Robert Vasquez, a border security supporter who lost a crowded GOP primary for Congress in 2006 won by current Rep. Bill Sali, is an announced candidate on the Republican side whether Craig runs or not.

Lieutenant Governor Jim Risch has also been mentioned as possible Republican candidate, especially if Craig chooses not to seek reelection.

On the Democratic side, former Congressman Larry LaRocco announced his candidacy in April 2007.

Larry Grant, who had also been mentioned as a possible Democratic contender, will most likely rematch against Sali instead, leaving LaRocco as the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination[8]. Craig, who will be 63 in 2008 and who has never faced a serious electoral challenge from either party in over 25 years in Congress, would be heavily favored to win a reelection campaign.

The seat would remain favored Republican even if Craig retires, as no Democrat has won a Senate race in Idaho since Frank Church in 1974.

Chuck Hagel (R) of Nebraska

Main article: Nebraska United States Senate election, 2008

In Nebraska, incumbent Republican Chuck Hagel may retire, regardless of whether he runs for President.[9] Hagel would likely be reelected for a third term should he decide to run. On the Democratic side, three influential Senators have encouraged two-term Omaha mayor Mike Fahey to consider a bid for the seat should Hagel decide to retire. Those Senators include Harry Reid (Majority Leader), Charles Schumer (DSCC Chair), and Ben Nelson (of Nebraska).[10]

John Warner (R) of Virginia

Main article: Virginia United States Senate election, 2008

In Virginia, John Warner has announced that he will run for a sixth term in 2008, at which point he will be 82 years old. However, highly popular former Governor Mark Warner, who won 47% of the vote in a challenge to Warner in 1996 as a little-known political neophyte, may run.[11]

Democratic incumbent races

Max Baucus of Montana

Main article: Montana United States Senate election, 2008

Max Baucus is a popular Democrat in Montana, serving in a state that has long been fairly Republican but also is receptive to Democrats. President George W. Bush won Montana by more than 20 points in both 2000 and 2004, but Montana also has a popular Democratic governor and a newly-elected Democratic junior senator.

Senator Baucus is unlikely to face a significant challenge, unless Republican Congressman Denny Rehberg runs, which would be a rematch of the 1996 contest. Rehberg has not made any formal announcement that he plans to do so, and, should he desire a promotion to the Senate, is more likely to wait until 2012, when freshman Senator Jon Tester will come up for re-election.

Dick Durbin of Illinois

Main article: Illinois United States Senate election, 2008

Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin remains favored in Illinois. He seeks to be reelected in a state that has steadily become more Democratic since 1992.

Tom Harkin of Iowa

Main article: Iowa United States Senate election, 2008

Tom Harkin says he is "doing everything" he can to run for re-election including raising money and putting together a campaign organization.[12]

Harkin received 54% of the vote in 2002 against former Republican Congressman Greg Ganske. In 2006, the Democrats gained two US House seats and won both State Houses as well as retaining the Iowa Governor's Mansion.

Tim Johnson of South Dakota

Main article: South Dakota United States Senate election, 2008

In South Dakota, the seat of Tim Johnson could be a top GOP target in 2008, considering Johnson's narrow 524-vote victory in 2002 over then-Congressman John Thune, as well as his recent health problems.

(Johnson underwent surgery in December 2006 for a Cerebral arteriovenous malformation.) According to a November 2006 SurveyUSA poll, Johnson has an approval rating of 70%, with just 26% disapproving of his performance.[13] Republican Governor Mike Rounds would have the power to appoint a replacement should Johnson vacate his seat prematurely.

John Kerry of Massachusetts

Main article: Massachusetts United States Senate election, 2008

John Kerry will seek another Senate term in Massachusetts.[14] A December 2006 SurveyUSA poll put Kerry's approval rating at only 43%, with 53% disapproving. [15]

Republican author and conservative activist Jerome Corsi, known for his public criticism of Kerry, has stated that he will run for the seat in 2008.[16]

Mary Landrieu of Louisiana

Main article: Louisiana United States Senate election, 2008

Mary Landrieu was elected in 1996 following a recount, and re-elected in 2002 following a runoff. Landrieu must now endure the loss of many reliable Democratic voters since Hurricane Katrina dispersed many African-Americans from New Orleans. Louisiana elected David Vitter to the Senate in 2004, the state's first Republican Senator since Reconstruction. Lousiana's electoral votes also went to George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004.

Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey

Main article: New Jersey United States Senate election, 2008

Frank Lautenberg has indicated that he will seek reelection in 2008 at the age of 84, though other Democratic politicians have also shown interest in running in New Jersey, such as Congressmen Rush Holt and Rob Andrews. It is unclear if any of these Democrats will actually challenge Lautenberg, who has the lowest approval rating of any Democrat running for re-election.[17]

Republicans have a field of potential candidates such as Assemblymen Bill Baroni and Michael J. Doherty. 2006 Republican candidate Tom Kean, Jr., may decide to run again. Republican Assemblyman Bill Baroni might run against Lautenberg. Baroni is a 34-year-old law professor who was the only Republican to defeat a Democratic incumbent in 2003 and won re-election in 2005.[18]

Republican Assemblyman Michael J. Doherty is also weighing a run against Lautenberg. Doherty is a lawyer and West Point graduate who has been in the Assembly since 2001.[19]

A November 2006 SurveyUSA poll on Senator Lautenberg shows an approval rating of 39% with 45% disapproval,[20] although similar lopsided disapproval ratings did not impair the election of his colleague Senator Robert Menendez.

Carl Levin of Michigan

Main article: Michigan United States Senate election, 2008

Carl Levin has announced he will seek re-election in Michigan.[21] He will be 74 in 2008.

Mark Pryor of Arkansas

Main article: Arkansas United States Senate election, 2008

Mark Pryor might be targeted in his first race as an incumbent. Pryor was the only Democrat to defeat an incumbent Republican Senator in the otherwise GOP-dominant 2002 election. While George W. Bush won in Arkansas in both 2000 and 2004, he won it by a smaller margin than most of the other Southern states, and the home of the Clinton family has Democratic Representatives for three out of its four House seats along with Democratic Senator Blanche Lincoln.

Jack Reed of Rhode Island

Main article: Rhode Island United States Senate election, 2008

In Rhode Island, Jack Reed is fairly popular, with a November 2006 approval rating of 66% according to SurveyUSA.[22] National Journal has declared that "Reed is probably the safest incumbent of the (2008) cycle."[1]

Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia

Main article: West Virginia United States Senate election, 2008

Jay Rockefeller, a great-grandson of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller and the only current politician out of the Rockefeller family, will seek reelection in West Virginia. Even though West Virginia is a traditionally Democratic state, in which the party had a 50-32% edge in party affiliation over the Republicans in the 2004 elections, the state party is more conservative than the national party, giving 30% of its votes to President George W. Bush in that election to allow him to win then and in 2000.[23].

Republican incumbent races

Lamar Alexander of Tennessee

Main article: Tennessee United States Senate election, 2008

Even though Lamar Alexander has strong prospects for a 2008 re-election bid, Tennessee, like most other southern states, still has a strong bevy of Democratic candidates. For the Democrats, a leading candidate in 2008 could be former Representative and 2006 U.S. Senate nominee Harold Ford, who ran a surprisingly strong campaign in Tennessee in 2006. In December 2006, Ford said that he was planning to run for Alexander's seat, but in January 2007 he said that he then had no such plan.[24][25]

Saxby Chambliss of Georgia

Main article: Georgia United States Senate election, 2008

In 2002, Georgian Saxby Chambliss defeated Democrat Max Cleland, a disabled Vietnam Veteran. Chambliss will seek reelection in 2008.

Vernon Jones, the CEO of Dekalb County has indicated an interest in running and is canvassing the state to determine voters' concerns. Jones is African-American and is a conservative Democrat who voted for George Bush in 2004.[26]

Jim Marshall is under pressure to not run, as some Democrats are worried he would lose his House seat representing Georgia's 8th congressional district.[27]

There is some speculation that former Secretary of State Cathy Cox, a Democrat, who unsuccessfully sought her party's nomination for governor in 2006, may jump into the race.

Another potential candidate is wealthy Macon-based trial attorney Jim Butler, who some Democrats have dubbed "the next John Edwards".
Thad Cochran of Mississippi

Main article: Mississippi United States Senate election, 2008

In Mississippi, incumbent Republican Thad Cochran has decided to run for reelection.[28] He is not likely to face serious opposition.
Norm Coleman of Minnesota

Main article: Minnesota United States Senate election, 2008

Norm Coleman won a tight contest in 2002 against former Democratic Vice-President Walter Mondale after the incumbent Senator, Democrat Paul Wellstone, died in an October plane crash. Minnesota politics, which had been getting less Democratic for a decade, showed signs of returning to its Democratic roots in 2004 after major gains in the state legislature and support for John Kerry by one point more than Al Gore had in 2000.

In 2006, relatively popular Republican Governor Tim Pawlenty barely won re-election, Democrat Amy Klobuchar handily beat retiring Republican Representative Mark Kennedy in a Senate race, and the Democrats took large majorities in the Minnesota State House, gaining 19 additional seats, and made further gains in the state senate. Six term Republican Rep. Gil Gutknecht was also defeated that year.

Comedian and former radio talk show host Al Franken confirmed on the final broadcast of his radio show Air America, February 14, 2007, that he will run for the Senate seat in 2008.[29] He had publicly speculated about running for some time and in 2005, he established the Midwest Values PAC to lay the groundwork for that campaign.

The 2008 Republican National Convention is being held in the capital city of St. Paul, where Coleman was once Mayor (elected in 1993 as a moderate-to-conservative DFLer and re-elected in 1997 as a Republican).

According to a January 2007 SurveyUSA poll, Coleman has an approval rating of 55%, with 36% disapproving of his performance.[30] However, a late March SurveyUSA poll has his approvals sinking to 47 percent with 43 percent dissaproving. Franken is reporting that he has raised 1.3 million dollars in the first quarter of 2007.

Susan Collins of Maine

Main article: Maine United States Senate election, 2008

In Maine, Susan Collins has informed the Lewiston Sun Journal that she intends to seek another term.[31] Collins remains very popular, with a 73% job approval rating in November 2006, and is likely to start as a strong favorite.[32] Also in Collins' favor is the landslide re-election of Maine's senior senator, Republican Olympia Snowe, who had the largest margin of victory of any Senate candidate (besides the largely unopposed Indiana Republican Dick Lugar) in the 2006 election cycle. Collins was re-elected with 58% of the vote in 2002 over state senator Chellie Pingree.

Democratic Congressman Tom Allen recently expressed some interest in running and has been building the apparatus necessary to wage a senate campaign.[33]

John Cornyn of Texas

Main article: Texas United States Senate election, 2008

John Cornyn has a 45% job approval rating as of November 2006.[34] Texas has not elected a Democrat in a statewide election since 1994. The strongest Democrats whose names are mentioned as possible challengers to Cornyn are Houston mayor Bill White and Hispanic conservative Democrat Henry Cuellar. Democratic internet activists have recently become highly excited about the potential candidacy of State Representative and military veteran Rick Noriega.

Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina

Main article: North Carolina United States Senate election, 2008

In North Carolina, there had been rumors that Elizabeth Dole would retire from the Senate and run for Governor, but she said in 2006 that she intends to run for re-election.[35] If she does, she will probably be an initial favorite unless she faces Democratic Governor Mike Easley, who will not be running for re-election because of term limits.

A Dole-Easley race would be highly competitive, but Easley has indicated that he is not interested in serving in any legislature. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has attempted to recruit Easley for the 2008 race. A recent poll showed Easley defeating Dole, 44% to 41%.[36] There are other Democrats whose names are being mentioned, such as Congressman Brad Miller and state Attorney General Roy Cooper.

Pete Domenici of New Mexico

Main article: New Mexico United States Senate election, 2008

Incumbent Republican Pete Domenici has declared that he will seek reelection in New Mexico. Rumors of a possible retirement have persisted due to Domenici's lack of fundraising activity, but his February campaign announcement included a fundraising schedule and confidence in his ability to raise appropriate funds.[37]

Domenici would be normally expected to win re-election easily, having won his current term with the support of two out of three New Mexico voters; however, his involvement in a scandal regarding the firing of U.S. attorneys could put this race in play.

Michael Enzi of Wyoming

Main article: Wyoming United States Senate election, 2008

Mike Enzi is likely to be re-elected without significant opposition in strongly Republican Wyoming, barring some unforeseen development.
Lindsey Graham of South Carolina

Main article: South Carolina United States Senate election, 2008

Lindsey Graham, as a reasonably popular Republican incumbent in strongly conservative South Carolina, is unlikely to be vulnerable to a Democratic challenge, though he is expected to face opposition in the Republican primary.

Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma

Main article: Oklahoma United States Senate election, 2008

In Oklahoma, Jim Inhofe has been quiet about his plans for 2008. A November 2006 SurveyUSA poll put Inhofe's approval rating at 46 percent, with 41 percent disapproving of his performance.[38]

Mitch McConnell of Kentucky

Main article: Kentucky United States Senate election, 2008

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will be a target for Democrats, who have a number of potential candidates to challenge him in Kentucky.

Pat Roberts of Kansas

Main article: Kansas United States Senate election, 2008

Pat Roberts has indicated that he will seek reelection. Kansas has not elected a Democrat to the Senate since 1932.

Jeff Sessions of Alabama

Main article: Alabama United States Senate election, 2008

In Alabama, Jeff Sessions has a strong chance of being re-elected. On January 10th, 2007, Congressman Artur Davis announced that he will not run for the seat.[39]

Despite going heavily for George W. Bush in 2004, Alabama still has a strong Democratic presence; Democrats still control a majority of both houses in the Alabama Legislature. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee recently said that Ron Sparks and Vivian Davis Figures are considering running for the seat.

Sparks is currently serving his second term as Alabama's Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries and Figures is a state senator from the Mobile area. Markos Moulitsas, creator of Daily Kos, wrote favorably of Sparks after a favorable profile of him was posted on the Swing State Project.

Gordon Smith of Oregon

Main article: Oregon United States Senate election, 2008

Gordon Smith is likely to run for a third term in Oregon, and may be vulnerable. Oregon businessman Ty Pettit is so far the only announced candidate for the Democratic nomination. Possible Democratic contenders include Congressmen Earl Blumenauer and Peter DeFazio and state Senator Ben Westlund. A poll shows DeFazio beating Smith 42-38.

Ted Stevens of Alaska

Main article: Alaska United States Senate election, 2008

In Alaska, Ted Stevens will be 85 years old in 2008, but he has indicated that he will seek reelection.

John Sununu of New Hampshire

Main article: New Hampshire United States Senate election, 2008

John Sununu represents swing state New Hampshire, which traditionally leans Republican, but which John Kerry from neighboring Massachusetts narrowly won in the 2004 Presidential election and which saw major Democratic gains in the 2006 elections. Democrats took both of the previously Republican-held House seats, the gubernatorial race by a record margin, and majorities in the State House and Senate.

A spokesman for popular Democratic Governor John Lynch said Lynch would not run for Sununu's seat in 2008.[40] Portsmouth' Mayor Steve Marchand (D) has announced his candidacy[41] and Katrina Swett (D), who ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 2002 and whose husband Richard Swett once served in Congress, has also announced.[42]

State-Incumbent-Status-Possible opposing candidates-2002 Election Results[43]


Alabama-Jeff Sessions (R)-Running for Re-election-Ron Sparks (D)-Jeff Sessions (R) 59%; Susan Parker (D) 40%; Other 1%


Alaska-Ted Stevens (R)-Running for Re-election-Mark Begich (D)-Ted Stevens (R) 78% ; Frank J. Vondersaar (D) 11%; Jim Sykes (G) 8%; Other 3%


Arkansas-Mark Pryor (D)-Running for Re-election--Tim Hutchinson (R) 46%; Mark Pryor (D) 54%


Colorado-Wayne Allard (R)-Retiring-Bob Beauprez (R)Gale Norton (R)Bentley Rayburn (R)Bob Schaffer (R)John Suthers (R)
Tom Strickland (D)Mark Udall (D)-Wayne Allard (R) 51%; Tom Strickland (D) 46%; Other 3%


Delaware-Joe Biden (D)-Running for President-Michael Castle (R)-Joe Biden (D) 58%; Raymond J. Clatworthy (R) 41%; Other 1%


Georgia-Saxby Chambliss (R)-Running for Re-election-Vernon Jones (D)-Max Cleland (D) 46%; Saxby Chambliss (R) 53%; Other 1%


Idaho-Larry Craig (R)--Robert Vasquez (R)
Larry Grant (D)Larry LaRocco (D)-Larry Craig (R) 65%; Alan Blinken (D) 33%; Other 2%


Illinois-Dick Durbin (D)-Running for Re-election-Bill Brady (R)Steve Greenberg (R)Andy Martin (R)Jim Oberweis (R)Kevin O'Hara (R)Kathy Salvi (R)-Dick Durbin (D) 60%; Jim Durkin (R) 38%; Other 2%


Iowa-Tom Harkin (D)-Running for Re-election-Steve King (R)Tom Latham (R)-Tom Harkin (D) 54%; Greg Ganske (R) 44%; Other 2%


Kansas-Pat Roberts (R)-Running for Re-election--Pat Roberts (R) 83%; Steven A. Rosile (L) 9%; George Cook (Reform) 8%


Kentucky-Mitch McConnell (R)-Running for Re-election-Phyllis George (D)-Mitch McConnell (R) 65%; Lois Combs Weinberg (D) 35%


Louisiana-Mary Landrieu (D)-Running for Re-election--Mary Landrieu (D) 52%; Suzanne Haik Terrell (R) 48%


Maine-Susan Collins (R)-Running for Re-election-Tom Allen (D)Chellie Pingree (D)-Susan Collins (R) 58%; Chellie Pingree (D) 42%


Massachusetts-John Kerry (D)-Running for Re-election-Jerome Corsi (R)-John Kerry (D) 80%; Michael E. Cloud (L) 18%; Others 2%


Michigan-Carl Levin (D)-Running for Re-election-Michelle Engler (R)-Carl Levin (D) 60%; Andrew Raczkowski (R) 38%; Other 2%


Minnesota-Norm Coleman (R)-Running for Re-election-Mike Ciresi (D)Judi Dutcher (D)Al Franken (D)Dean Johnson (D)Becky Lourey (D)Betty McCollum (D)R. T. Rybak (D)Patty Wetterling (D)-Norm Coleman (R) 50%; Walter Mondale (D) 47%; Other 4%


Mississippi-Thad Cochran (R)--Mike Moore (D)Gene Taylor (D)-Thad Cochran (R) 85%; Shawn O'Hara (Reform) 15%


Montana-Max Baucus (D)-Running for Re-election-Marc Racicot (R)Denny Rehberg (R)-Max Baucus (D) 63%; Mike Taylor (R) 32%; Other 5%


Nebraska-Chuck Hagel (R)--Mike Fahey (D)Scott Kleeb (D)-Chuck Hagel (R) 83%; Charlie A. Matulka (D) 15%; Other 2%


New Hampshire-John Sununu (R)-Running for Re-election-Jay Buckey (D)Steve Marchand (D)Jeanne Shaheen (D)Katrina Swett (D)-John Sununu (R) 51%; Jeanne Shaheen (D) 46%; Other 3%


New Jersey-Frank Lautenberg (D)-Running for Re-election--Frank Lautenberg (D) 54%; Douglas R. Forrester (R) 44%; Other 2%


New Mexico-Pete Domenici (R)-Running for Re-election-Tom Udall (D)-Pete Domenici (R) 65%; Gloria Tristani (D) 35%


North Carolina-Elizabeth Dole (R)-Running for Re-election-Roy Cooper (D)Mike Easley (D)-Elizabeth Dole (R) 54%; Erskine Bowles (D) 45%; Other 1%


Oklahoma-Jim Inhofe (R)-Running for Re-election-Brad Carson (D)-Jim Inhofe (R) 57%; David Walters (D) 36%; James Germalic Independent 6%; Other 1%


Oregon-Gordon Smith (R)-Running for Re-election-Bill Sizemore (R)
Earl Blumenauer (D)Ben Westlund (D)Peter DeFazio (D)-Gordon Smith (R) 56%; Bill Bradbury (D) 40%; Other 4%


Rhode Island-Jack Reed (D)-Running for Re-election--Jack Reed (D) 78%; Robert G. Tingle (R) 22%


South Carolina-Lindsey Graham (R)-Running for Re-election--Lindsey Graham (R) 54%; Alex Sanders (D) 44%; Other 2%


South Dakota-Tim Johnson (D)--Mike Rounds (R)-Tim Johnson (D) 50%; John R. Thune (R) 49%; Other 1%


Tennessee-Lamar Alexander (R)-Running for Re-election--Lamar Alexander (R) 54%; Bob Clement (D) 44%; Other 2%


Texas-John Cornyn (R)-Running for Re-election-Rick Noriega (D)-John Cornyn (R) 55%; Ron Kirk (D) 43%; Other 2%


Virginia-John Warner (R)--Tom Davis (R)
Don Beyer (D)R. Creigh Deeds (D)Claudia Kennedy (D)Brian Moran (D)Mark Warner (D)-John Warner (R) 83%; Nancy Spannaus (Independent) 10%; Jacob G. Hornberger, Jr. (Independent) 7%


West Virginia-Jay Rockefeller (D)-Running for Re-election--Jay Rockefeller (D) 63%; Jay Wolfe (R) 37%


Wyoming-Mike Enzi (R)-Running for Re-election--Mike Enzi (R) 73%; Joyce Jansa Corcoran (D) 27%


State-Incumbent-Status-Opposing candidates-2002 Election Results

External links

References

^ Todd, Chuck. "Campaign Race Rankings: 2008 Senate Races", National Journal, National Journal, 2006-02-12. Retrieved on February 24, 2007.


^ CQ Staff (2007-01-26). Ratings Chart: 2008 Senate Races. Congressional Quarterly Inc.. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Cillizza, Chris. "Sen. Allard Says He Will Retire in 2008", The Washington Post, January 16, 2007. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ "Allard won’t run again in 2008", Cañon City Daily Record, Associated Press, 2007-01-16. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ "Elway nixes '08 Senate run", Rocky Mountain News, 2007-01-17. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Sealover, Ed. "Shift puts key state issues in question", Colorado Springs Gazette, November 8, 2006. Retrieved on November 11, 2006.


^ Associated Press. "McCain considers running for US presidency in 2008; Biden plans run; Feingold steps out", International Herald Tribune, November 13, 2006. Retrieved on November 15, 2006.


^ LaRocco to run for Senate; Craig mum on future Accessed 6 April 2007


^ Kaiser, Robert G.. "The Political Veteran", Washington Post, November 15, 2004. Retrieved on November 15, 2006.


^ Kotok, C. David. "D.C. chat has Fahey considering Senate bid", Omaha World-Herald, February 11, 2007. Retrieved on February 11, 2007.


^ Cillizza, Chris, Michael D. Shear. "Va.'s Two Warners May Be Headed for Rematch", The Washington Post, February 28, 2007. Retrieved on March 1, 2007.


^ Norman, Jane. "Harkin points toward re-election bid", The Des Moines Register, 2007-01-18. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11163. SurveyUSA (November 2006). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Klein, Rick. "Kerry won't run for president in '08", The Boston Globe, 2007-01-24. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11479. SurveyUSA (2006-12-20). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Finer, Jonathan. "Another Crack at Kerry", Washington Post, January 28, 2005. Retrieved on November 16, 2006.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11152. SurveyUSA (November 2006). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Bevensee, Rich, Jenifer Braun, Judy DeHaven, Brian Donohue, Kitta MacPherson, Tom Moran and Michael Sommers. "People to watch in 2007: Bill Baroni", The Star-Ledger, 2007-01-07, pp. 4-5. Retrieved on January 24, 2007.


^ Burton, Cynthia. "Lautenberg bulks up funds for '08 run", The Philadelphia Inquirer, 2007-02-06. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11152. SurveyUSA (November 2006). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ "Levin to seek another Senate term in '08", Associated Press, MSNBC.com, December 4, 2006. Retrieved on February 6, 2006.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11161. SurveyUSA (2006-11-22). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Election 2004 West Virginia Exit Poll. CNN.com (2004-11-02). Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Richard Locker, Another Senate seat might tempt Ford, The Commercial Appeal, December 11, 2006


^ "Ford says he has no plans of a Senate bid against Alexander", WMCTV.com, Associated Press, 2007-01-23. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Tagami, Ty. "DeKalb CEO fund-raiser may test Senate campaign waters", The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2007-02-13. Retrieved on February 13, 2007.


^ Grim, Ryan. "Headline: In 'Open' Season, Candidates Are Blossoming", The Politico, 2007-02-12. Retrieved on February 13, 2007.


^ "Cochran raising money for anticipated bid for 6th term", Associated Press, February 21, 2007. Retrieved on February 23, 2007.


^ Smith, Dane. "Franken jumps into Senate race", Minneapolis Star Tribune, February 14, 2007. Retrieved on February 15, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11626. SurveyUSA (2007-01-24). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Farmer, David. "Collins to seek 3rd term", Sun Journal, 2006-10-13. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11141. SurveyUSA (2006-11-22). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Duran, Nicole. "Allen Ponders 2008 Senate Race", Roll Call, December 12, 2006. Retrieved on February 15, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11165. SurveyUSA (2006-11-22). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Christensen, Rob. "Mary Easley has active public life, but she's no Hillary Clinton", The News & Observer, 2006-06-12. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Dan Kane, Rob Christensen and J. Andrew Curliss. "Poll puts Easley over Dole", The News & Observer, 2007-01-25. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Talhelm, Jennifer. "Domenici: 'I am running' in 2008", The Santa Fe New Mexican, 2007-02-13. Retrieved on February 14, 2007.


^ Results of SurveyUSA News Poll #11158. SurveyUSA (2006-11-22). Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Associated Press. "Davis Won't Challenge Stevens", WTOK, January 9, 2007. Retrieved on January 10, 2007.


^ Pindell, James. "Shaheen doesn’t rule out US Senate re-match", The Boston Globe, 2006-01-17. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


^ Haberman, Shir. "Marchand says he'll run for Senate", The Portsmouth Herald, 2007-01-11. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Moskowitz, Eric. "Swett plans campaign for U.S. Senate", Concord Monitor, 2007-01-19. Retrieved on February 6, 2007.


^ Federal Elections: 2002 U.S. Senate Results. Federal Election Commission. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.


United States House elections, 2008

1 Major parties
2 Election summaries
2.1 Retiring Democratic governors
2.1.1 Ruth Ann Minner (Delaware)
2.1.2 Mike Easley (North Carolina)
2.2 Democratic incumbents
2.2.1 Togiola Tulafono (American Samoa)
2.2.2 Brian Schweitzer (Montana)
2.2.3 John Lynch (New Hampshire)
2.2.4 Aníbal Acevedo Vilá (Puerto Rico)
2.2.5 Christine Gregoire (Washington)
2.2.6 Joe Manchin (West Virginia)
2.3 Republican incumbents
2.3.1 Mitch Daniels (Indiana)
2.3.2 Matt Blunt (Missouri)
2.3.3 John Hoeven (North Dakota)
2.3.4 Jon Huntsman, Jr. (Utah)
2.3.5 Jim Douglas (Vermont)
3 See also
4 References

Major parties

As of January 2007, there are 22 Republican governors and 28 Democratic governors. The number may change after the 2007 races in Kentucky, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

Election summaries

Two governors are prohibited from seeking re-election in 2008, and a third, while eligible, is thought likely to retire. Further open seats are possible if any of the governors listed below dies, resigns, elects to retire, or is denied re-nomination in their party's primary.

Retiring Democratic governors

Ruth Ann Minner (Delaware)

Main article: Delaware gubernatorial election, 2008Ruth Ann Minner will be term limited in 2008. By 2008, Democrats will have controlled the Delaware governorship for 16 years. Leading Democratic contenders include Lieutenant Governor John Carney and State Treasurer Jack Markell.

Mike Easley (North Carolina)

Main article: North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2008

Mike Easley will be term limited in 2008. By 2008, Democrats will have controlled the North Carolina governorship for 16 years. Democratic Lieutenant Governor Beverly Perdue is currently considered the frontrunner to succeed Easley.

Democratic incumbents

Togiola Tulafono (American Samoa)

Main article: American Samoa gubernatorial election, 2008

American Samoa's Togiola Tulafono is up for reelection in 2008. He won his first term 55.7% to 44.3% in the 2004 run-off.

Brian Schweitzer (Montana)

Main article: Montana gubernatorial election, 2008

Brian Schweitzer of Montana is favored to win re-election.

John Lynch (New Hampshire)

Main article: New Hampshire gubernatorial election, 2008

In New Hampshire, John Lynch is favored to win re-election. There is speculation after Charlie Bass lost his seat in the House of Representatives in 2007 that he will run for Governor in 2008. Bass has yet to decide but could provide a formidable challenge to Lynch.
Aníbal Acevedo Vilá (Puerto Rico)

Main article: Puerto Rico gubernatorial election, 2008

Aníbal Acevedo Vilá of Puerto Rico is up for a second term in 2008. Republican at-large Resident Commissioner Luis Fortuño, who announced in December 2006 that he would not again seek reelection to his current post, is running against him.

Christine Gregoire (Washington)

Main article: Washington gubernatorial election, 2008

Christine Gregoire is perhaps best known for having won Washington's 2004 gubernatorial election by 133 votes in the third official count, after having lost the initial count by 261 votes and the first recount by 24 votes. Her 2004 opponent, former Washington State Senator Dino Rossi, is presumed to be her Republican opponent, but his candidacy has not been confirmed. By 2008, Democrats will have controlled the Washington governorship for 24 years.
Joe Manchin (West Virginia)

Main article: West Virginia gubernatorial election, 2008
Joe Manchin is favored to win re-election in West Virginia.
Republican incumbents
Mitch Daniels (Indiana)

Main article: Indiana gubernatorial election, 2008
Mitch Daniels may be vulnerable. While Indiana has not voted Democratic for President since 1964, Daniels is the first Republican elected governor in 20 years. His approval rating has not risen above 50% since 2005, and has been especially low in the wake of his prominent June 2006 deal to privatize the Indiana Toll Road by selling 75 year operation rights to a foreign consortium.

Some speculators believe that because Daniels was not on the ticket in 2006, public outrage over the sale of the toll road contributed to the 2006 defeats of three Republican congressmen in Indiana, Chris Chocola, John Hostettler, and Mike Sodrel. Daniels is currently facing a lawsuit from outraged truckers and commuters who claim that the decision to privatize the road went over the heads of the people, and the issue as a whole has made him very unpopular in Indiana.

Democrat Tim Roemer, a former congressman and member of the 9/11 Commission, would be among the strongest challengers to Daniels for the Governorship.

Democratic Congressman Baron Hill has been mentioned as a possible strong challenger to Daniels.[1]

Former Congresswoman and undersecretary of Agriculture Jill Long Thompson has also been mentioned as a possible challenger.

State Senate Minority Leader Richard Young and Indianapolis businessman Jim Schellinger announced their separate candidacies for Governor in early 2007.

Matt Blunt (Missouri)

Main article: Missouri gubernatorial election, 2008

Matt Blunt may be the most vulnerable incumbent governor seeking re-election. Blunt's approval rating is the nation's second-lowest after Governor Ernie Fletcher of Kentucky. Blunt's Democratic opponent will likely be four-term Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon.

John Hoeven (North Dakota)

Main article: North Dakota gubernatorial election, 2008
John Hoeven is not term-limited in 2008, and may run for reelection. Most governors in the state of North Dakota have chosen not to seek a third term and instead retired.

Jon Huntsman, Jr. (Utah)

Main article: Utah gubernatorial election, 2008
Jon Huntsman, Jr. is favored to win re-election in Utah. By 2008, Republicans will have controlled the Utah governorship for 24 years.

Jim Douglas (Vermont)

Main article: Vermont gubernatorial election, 2008
Jim Douglas is favored to win re-election should he seek it. By 2008, he will have been governor of Vermont for 6 years, or 3 terms.

Proactive Democrats, Obstructionist Republicans

The Senate GOP's strategy continues to be: avoid debating Iraq policy. That will go over very well in Colorado, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Maine, Oregon, Virginia, North Carolina...

 Tennessee: DKos diarist Sidof79 offers an insightful rundown of possible Democratic candidates to challenge Lamar Alexander. I didn't realize Tim McGraw was such an outspoken critic of George W. Bush.

 North Carolina: Another great DKos diary, from Blue South, sees Elizabeth Dole still well under 50% approval, and garnering only 45% in a hypothetical match-up against Rep. Bob Etheridge. Very troubling numbers for the Dole camp. I'm still holding out hope that Mike Easley will challenge Dole once he decides that he's not in the thick of the Veepstakes, as polling already has him beating Dole.

 Minnesota: Al Franken will push for universal health coverage. Once Minnesotans see Franken and Ciresi and other potential Democratic candidates out there discussing issues, then the ball will really start rolling.

 The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza has come out with his latest look at the Senate playing field. Cillizza is excited to see how a Franken candidacy shapes the dynamics of the MN race. Also, he sees the potential for CO SoS Mike Coffman entering a GOP primary for the super-conservative wing if Bob Schaffer doesn't get in to challenge Scott McInnis for the GOP nomination. Cillizza notes a push for GOP Rep. Richard Baker to challenge Mary Landrieu in Louisiana. He also seems as annoyed as I am that Thad Cochran is delaying his re-election vs. retirement decision.


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