Court Of Impeachment And War Crimes: While We Were Trying To Impeach Bush And Cheney Yesterday
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Tuesday, January 22, 2008

While We Were Trying To Impeach Bush And Cheney Yesterday



Impeaching Bush and Cheney is a challenge, a struggle, but we have been rudely reminded in recent days that explosive issues that emanate from the words “I Believe” tend to fester and resurface, given the right national atmosphere, instead of ever coming to closure.

Recently the Clinton and Obama campaigns engaged in embarrassing forays into the arena of playing the race and gender cards in sophomoric primary verbal trash. The media has nothing better to do than stand over the caldron of campaign stew stirring away at a tiny tear and dissecting to death how much credit in the Civil Rights Movement should be accorded martin Luther King and Lyndon B. Johnson, while Huckster Huckabee gets away with declaring that the Constitution should be brought into line with the Bible.

In the meantime, in Jena Louisiana, one would think we had regressed to the 1930s with the KKK intimidating local government and marching in the name of “White Supremacy” on Martin Luther King Day in a community already racially polarized by local events and dissensions.

Most of America paid polite or genuine homage to the memory of Martin Luther King Yesterday…I say most; not all.

In the Washington area theaters were jam packed with movie goers attending an appropriate film for the day: The Great Debaters. I was among them and the film was well worth my time.

http://www.thegreatdebatersmovie.com

http://www.thegreatdebatersmovie.com/site.html

Inspired by the remarkable story of Wiley College’s winning debate team of the early 1930s. Set against the backdrop of the Jim Crow South, THE GREAT DEBATERS chronicles the journey of the Wiley College debate team—coached by the brilliant and passionate professor Melvin B. Tolson (Denzel Washington). It was Tolson’s recognition that the power of knowledge is the greatest advantage of all, which brought these students from underdogs to victors in a time when more than the odds were against them.

One of the more interesting moments of my day came as we left the theater and an elder Caucasian woman with long nicely groomed white hair, just a touch of grey left, turned to what I assume was her Grand Daughter and said: “We lived through that shit honey!” Her appearance, elder, but not frail, her face full of life and her step spritely, made one feel good, and I also had the feeling by appearance and demeanor that she was marching with us in the 60s. It was a good feeling.

But elsewhere yesterday would provide memories for the future that would have best never been made. While I know we can legislate equality of opportunity in some fashion; I am equality aware that we can never legislate toleration, acceptance and morality. Yesterday Jena Louisiana provided a fresh reminder of that discouraging fact.

White Supremacist Protest in Jena, La. By MARY FOSTER – 4 hours ago

JENA, La. (AP) — A crowd mostly made up of members of the media listened as four white separatists demanded white rights, severe prosecution of six black teens accused of beating a white classmate and an end to the Martin Luther King holiday.

But the speeches didn't last long.

The "Jena Justice Day" planned Monday by the white supremacist Nationalist Movement ended about two hours earlier than organizers had planned, with most participants leaving long before that.

Still, Richard Barrett, a Nationalist spokesman, declared the day a success. He noted the group was successful earlier in having set aside the city's demand that it put up $10,000 to hold its rally and that it had collected about a dozen signatures to end the city's newly established interracial committee.

"We backed down the mayor, backed the committee down," he said. "So the chances are good we'll back the Jena Six down and Martin Luther King Day down as well."

The group opposes support of the so-called Jena Six — the six black teens whose case in September sparked one of the largest civil rights demonstrations in recent years — and a holiday for King, the slain civil rights leader.

About 50 white supremacists showed up Monday, with 27 marching to the high school and back before the speeches began.

About 100 counter-demonstrators turned out briefly to wave signs and shout slogans before marching away.

Chants of "No KKK!" from the mostly college-aged counter-demonstrators were met with a chant from the separatists that contained a racial epithet.

Several demonstrators reportedly showed up with guns. But there was just one arrest reported during the day — that of a man authorities identified as William Winchester Jr. of New Orleans and a member of THE NEW BLACK PANTHERS.

The arrest came after dozens of state police, at one point, forced back 10 people, dressed in New Black Panther uniforms who had gathered around a podium where Barrett was to speak. The man identified as Winchester broke away from that group and was booked with battery of a police officer and resisting arrest. Members of the New Black Panthers at the scene declined to comment.

Nearly all the demonstrators and the counter-demonstrators appeared to be from outside of Jena.

John N. Hill, Jr., 58, of Monroe, La., said he felt compelled to come denounce the white separatists.

"Nobody fears these people anymore," said Hill, who is black. "If you confront evil you can stop it. If you don't confront it, it grows like weeds."

Race relations in Jena, with a population of about 2,800, have been in the news since the arrest of the black students accused of beating the white teen in December 2006.

About 20,000 people peacefully marched in support of the Jena Six in September.

Five of the black teens were charged with attempted murder, leading to accusations that they were being prosecuted harshly because of their race. Charges have since been reduced.

"I think people here are tired of all of this," said LaSalle Parish sheriff-elect Scott Franklin. "And it's a shame for this to happen on this day especially. But hopefully this will be the end of it. Both sides have had their say now."

WHITE SEPARATISTS RALLY IN JENA, LA. By Mary Foster
Associated Press / January 22, 2008

JENA, La. - About 50 white separatists protested the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday yesterday in this tiny town, which was thrust into the spotlight months ago by 20,000 demonstrators who alleged prosecutors discriminated against blacks.

White separatists protest in Jena, La.

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Police separated participants in the "pro-majority" rally organized by the Nationalist Movement, based in Learned, Miss., from a racially mixed group of about 100 counter-demonstrators outside the LaSalle Parish Courthouse.

There was no violence and one counter-demonstrator was arrested.

Chants of "No KKK" from the mostly college-age counter-demonstrators were met with a chant from the separatists that contained a racial epithet.

At one point, dozens of state police forced back about 10 people, dressed in New Black Panther uniforms, who had gathered around a podium where the separatist group's leader, Richard Barrett, was to speak.

One man who broke away from that group was arrested and charged with battery on a police officer and resisting arrest; authorities identified him as William Winchester Jr. of New Orleans and said he was a member of the New Black Panthers.

Members of the group at the scene declined to comment.

Race relations in Jena, which has a population about 2,800, have been in the news ever since six black teenagers were arrested in the beating of a white classmate at Jena High School in December 2006.

About 20,000 people peacefully marched in support of the so-called Jena Six in September, and yesterday's demonstration was organized in opposition to both the teenagers and the King holiday.

Five of the black teens were originally charged with attempted murder, leading to accusations that they were being prosecuted harshly because of their race. Charges have since been reduced.

Critics of the prosecutor have noted that months before the beating, no charges were filed against three other white students accused of hanging nooses - seen as signs of racial intimidation - on a tree at the high school.

The prosecutor has said that the noose hangings, while "abhorrent," violated no state law.

Many Jena residents said that coverage of the controversy last year unfairly portrayed them as racists, and that Barrett's group brought renewed unwanted attention.

Only when faced with a lawsuit did the town drop a requirement that the Nationalists post a $10,000 security bond for a permit.

Almost all the demonstrators and counter-demonstrators appeared to be from outside Jena.

"I'd like to see more people from Jena here," said George Ferguson, a local resident who wore a T-shirt reading "Justice for Justin," referring to Justin Barker, the white teen beaten in the school attack. "I haven't seen anyone else I know."

A few locals, black and white, watched from the sidelines.

"I wanted to see what was going on, I've heard a lot about it," said Charles Bailey, a white 58-year-old Jena resident.

"It looks like a big waste of my tax money."

Law enforcement officers from several organizations, including Louisiana State Police and at least three parish sheriff's departments, were on hand.

Snipers staked out the roofs of buildings across the street from the courthouse.

Jena resident Dayna Brown, a black woman who made a scrapbook on the September protest, had her camera in hand yesterday. She said she was ready to see Jena's time in the spotlight end.

"I'm hoping this is the last of it," Brown said.

"Jena's not a bad place to live if you're black or white. We'd just all like to see things settle down."

JENA — Law enforcement officers were kept on their toes most of Monday as there were several incidents during the Nationalist Movement's "Jena Justice Day" rally and march. There was only one arrest.

When the New Black Panther Party, which antagonized police during the Sept. 20 rally in Jena, arrived Monday morning, law enforcement officers were at the ready, quickly providing a barrier between them and the group of Nationalist supporters setting up for their rally in front of the courthouse.

Panthers refused to speak with the media, only walking around intensely staring at those in the area.

They were quickly mobbed by the media, who were on hand in case there was a confrontation between the two groups.

One law enforcement officer joked that the media were helping ease the tension by distracting the Black Panthers, who the day before vowed they would obtain justice by "any means necessary."

They left the area after a few minutes.

Later, officers came face to face with a group they estimated to number about 200 who were protesting the Nationalists. The group marched until stopped by both a wall of law enforcement and patrol cars.

The LaSalle Parish sheriff's office said they would keep the two groups separate for security reasons and asked the mass to move behind the courthouse. They continued to shout slogans, but did not move. After about 15 minutes and threats of arrest for noncompliance, the group relented and marched back to Jena's City Park, where it had started.

The biggest scuffle between protesters and police came around 12:40 p.m. when a Black Panther allegedly struck an officer. This came after state troopers, who were surrounding the group trying to keep them from interacting with the Nationalists, repeatedly asked them to go to the designated counter-demonstration area.

After the arrest, the group was pushed behind the barricade and had a nearly 20-minute stare-off with officers with a barricade between the two groups.

Jena residents interested in activities

The area behind the courthouse at times was filled with Jena residents denying support or affiliation with either group, saying they were observing or "keeping an eye" on their town.
There was one white man standing in the alleyway wearing a large afro wig.

Many of the residents were snapping pictures of both the protesters and the supporters of the Nationalists.

The storefront windows of the McCartney-Slay Chevrolet-Pontiac-GMC dealership across from the courthouse were full of people taking pictures and watching the events.

During the march, a number of residents were standing outside their homes watching. Some gave a friendly wave, while others just stood silently. On at least three separate occasions, Nationalist spokesman Richard Barrett walked up to the people and handed them small American flags.

Other residents watched the march go by with their noses pressed against their windows.
None wanted to talk about it.

— Town Talk staff

JENA — Tension was thick Monday, the day the Nationalist Movement picked to march through Jena, as counter-demonstrators found themselves surrounded several times by a swarm of law enforcement.

One arrest was made after a New Black Panther was alleged to have struck a state trooper.

The Nationalist Movement's parade and rally at its peak had about 30 supporters. By the end of the day, there were about five left standing, listening as the group's spokesman, Richard Barrett, shouted into the microphone. Two stepped up when Barrett asked for the people of Jena "to speak out." Both were from West Monroe.

Those protesting the Nationalists' message far outnumbered the supporters with at least 200 marching with signs, banners and a mega-phone until officers stopped them.

Local, parish, state and federal law enforcement were on alert from the get-go as those coming to support the Nationalist's "Jena Justice Day" parade and march came armed.

David Dupre and his son David Dupre Jr., both of Tioga, came with three firearms a piece — a .357 Magnum, .22-caliber revolver and 12-gauge shotgun.

The Dupres said they came to support the Nationalists, and were armed to protect themselves.
Jena Police Chief Paul Smith said he saw the men pull the guns out after they parked across the street from the LaSalle Parish Courthouse. He said he told the men they couldn't take the shotguns out, and that they wouldn't be allowed to march armed.

A few hours later, Mark Smith, who had been contracted by the LaSalle Parish sheriff's office for crisis communication, announced that those supporting and opposing the Nationalists would be kept separate for their own safety, the safety of law enforcement and others observing the activities.

For much of the day several residents milled about the courthouse lawn, staying toward the back and keeping an eye on the events. Many snapped pictures of both the Nationalist supporters and the protestors.

Dayna Brown, who said she's lived in Jena her whole life, was watching the Nationalist supporters set up for the rally. "I think it's offensive what's happening," she said of the group coming in.

The Nationalist supporters began their march walking down First Street toward U.S. Highway 84 with a small group of counter-protesters following behind.

A group of about a dozen New Black Panthers was near the front of the courthouse as the march made its way back. State police surrounded the group, asking them to move to the back of the courthouse for their own safety, police said.

State Police said after repeated requests to move, some members became "verbally and physically aggressive." Media enveloped the troopers with cameras raised above their heads.
After several small shoving matches between the group and troopers, the situation escalated, some media was elbowed and stepped on as one man was pulled out and taken away in cuffs. William Winchester Jr., 42, of New Orleans, was charged with battery of a police officer and resisting arrest after hitting an officer, state police said.

QUOTES FROM MORONS ON THE SCENE!

She said she was ready to see Jena's time in the spotlight end.

Other residents watched the march go by with their noses pressed against their windows.
None wanted to talk about it.
"Jena's not a bad place to live if you're black or white. We'd just all like to see things settle down."

"I think people here are tired of all of this," said LaSalle Parish sheriff-elect Scott Franklin. "And it's a shame for this to happen on this day especially. But hopefully this will be the end of it. Both sides have had their say now."

Do You Remember “Back To The Future”, Well How About Fast Forward Into The Past”? Ed.

OH YES AMERICAN; WE’RE IN FINE SHAPE…JUST DANDY!

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